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Sucarnochee Folklife Festival set for April 19

Please click on the Festival logo to view and download all Festival event forms.

Please click on the Festival logo to view and download all Festival event forms.

The Sucarnochee Folklife Festival (SFF) celebrates its tenth year anniversary on Saturday, April 19, from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. in downtown Livingston. 

Favorite Blue Ribbon contests such as the cornbread cook-off, pie baking, home canning, cake baking and BBQ sauce scheduled. New to festival this year is the Black Belt Quilt Show. The community is invited to submit quilts to be displayed at the event. There is no competition, but instead a group collection from Sumter County for all to enjoy.

“We are excited about this year’s Black Belt Quilt Show. This event is part of a regional project that hopes to establish a Black Black Quilt Trail,” said Center for the Study of the Black Belt Executive Director Dr. Tina Naremore Jones. “Thanks to the Alabama State Council on the Arts and the University of West Alabama Archives, a quilt created as part of our nation’s bicentennial celebration will be on display. The quilt features an outline of Sumter County with individual quilt blocks created by different communities.”

A day of great music is also in store for festival attendees with a stage show including the sounds of Jack White and friends, and exciting local talent in the special afternoon of “Sumter Spotlight” performances.

“We want to encourage people interested in the Blue Ribbon competition to begin working now on their entries,” said Dr. Tina N. Jones, University of West Alabama’s Center for the Study of the Black Belt executive director. “Although held the third Saturday in April, the Festival will be here before we know it; some categories require early preparation and practice.”

The contests are an important part of the SFF, supporting the event in keeping to its original purpose.

“The Blue Ribbon Contests tie back to the original goal of the festival and why it began- as a way to teach people about traditions and customs of the Black Belt region and keep them alive for future generations,” explained Jones. “In addition, as these competitions are held, we add to the stories of the Black Belt that are shared and our unique stories grow.”

All are invited to the courthouse square to celebrate “Ten Years of Festival Fun.” Family enjoyment is offered to those of all ages as music, food, storytelling, art, and much more are shared throughout the day.

Other sponsors of the event include the University of West Alabama, Black Belt Museum, UWA Fine Arts Department, Alabama State Council on the Arts, Black Belt Conservation & Research Institute, Alabama Department of Tourism, City of Livingston, and the Sumter County Commission.

For more information on the Sucarnochee Folklife Festival, please call (205) 652-3828, email centerforblackbelt@uwa.edu.

Click HERE to view and download all Festival event forms.

 

The Black Belt Connection

The Black Belt Connection March/April newsletter, along with newsletter archives, are available here.

BBConnectionCOVERWebMarchSMApril2014

 

Campbell Environmental Educational Center dedicated March 18

The Campbell Environmental Education Center was dedicated on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Pictured at event are, from top, Business Manger Lawson Edmonds, Asst. Director of Physical Plant Bobby Truelove, Vice President of Financial Affairs Raiford Noland, Director of Physical Plant Bob Holycross, Educational Asst. CSBB Rosa Hall, Dean-Division of Educational Outreach Dr. Tina Jones, Black Belt Museum Curator Dr. John Hall, UWA Special Administrator John Blackwell and wife, Shirley.

The Campbell Environmental Education Center was dedicated on Tuesday, March 18, 2014. Pictured at event are, from top, Business Manger Lawson Edmonds, Asst. Director of Physical Plant Bobby Truelove, Vice President of Financial Affairs Raiford Noland, Campbell family friends Bill and Linda Virgin, Director of Physical Plant Bob Holycross, Educational Asst. CSBB Rosa Hall, Dean-Division of Educational Outreach Dr. Tina Jones, Black Belt Museum Curator Dr. John Hall, UWA Special Administrator John Blackwell and wife, Shirley.

The Campbell Environmental Education Center (CEEC) at the University of West Alabama was dedicated on Tuesday, March 18, 2014, at 10:30 a.m. on the Livingston campus.

The Campbell Environmental Education Center is home to offices of the Division of Educational Outreach’s Black Belt Museum and Black Belt Garden. In addition, an educational classroom and community meeting room (which is rentable to the public) are located in the building.

The former Campbell-Strickland House was built in southwest Sumter County in 1900 by Robert Campbell and Susan Alice Gully, and housed a family of eleven, including eight children and a local school teacher.

The house is divided into three sections, the left of which held (from back to front) a kitchen, a dining room, the teacher’s quarters, and Mrs. Campbell’s sun parlor where she painted and displayed her artwork. The front porch now extends across the entire length of the front of the house, replacing the sun parlor. However, the original windows that divided the sun parlor from the front room remain. These unusual windows recede into the attic space allowing them to be used as doorways.

The middle section of the house consisted of two large bedrooms that housed the five daughters of the family—Alice, Laura, Betty, Justina, and Sarah—while the right section of the house also consisted of two large bedrooms, the front one being for the family’s three boys (Bob, Slocum, and Wayne) and the back one being for Robert and Susan.

The house, with its white and green paint scheme, looks much like it did when first built.  The sun parlor, which was added later, was too badly deteriorated to move.  Stairs came off of the front porch in front of each breezeway. Paths from the stairways met at the gate of a long picket fence. The bed that was created by the front porch and pathways was filled with rose bushes and daffodils while the backyard was shaded by pecan trees. The Campbell’s ran a general store, situated nearby, along a road that ran in front of the house.

The house was donated in 2009 to the University by owners Larry and Crystal Strickland of York.

For information on the Campbell Environmental Education Center, please contact UWA’s Center for the Study of the Black Belt in the Division of Educational Outreach at (205) 652-3828.

Craft of twining explored in Moore’s book

Twined Bags: An Historical Finger-Weaving Craft of Native Americans contains 84 photos and illustrations. Over 9,000 years old, the craft of twining, according to archeological findings was once utilitarian. Be a part of the generation that is helping to keep this tradition alive. Easy-to-follow instructions, helpful hints and suggestions will enable you to learn the simple weaving technique known as twining.

Monica Moore is a living historian who practices the Native American skills of making twined bags and deer toe leggings shakers, for traditional stomp dancing. She is also the executive secretary at the University of West Alabama’s Division of Educational Outreach. For more information or to purchase a book, contact Moore at 205-366-2275, monica@twinedbags.com, and visit her website at www.twinedbags.com.

 

 

A review of  Twined Bags: An Historical Finger-Weaving Craft of Native Americans by Vincent Spiotti of Muzzleloader magazine can be viewed here.

 

 

Continuing Education Summer Art Classes announced

The Department of Continuing Education in the Division of Educational Outreach at the University of West Alabama is now offering a variety of painting and fiber art classes at the Livingston campus and Demopolis Higher Education Center.

 

Loops at Land with Monica Moore in Livingson

Each Tuesday, fellow fiber artists meet at Land Hall on the UWA campus in Livingston from 5:30-7:30 p.m. to work on unfinished projects or discover new projects and techniques. Participants work on many projects involving the fiber arts including knitting, crocheting, tatting, twining, finger-weaving, cross stitching, needle-felting, weaving, embroidery, sewing and quilting. Beginning students and accomplished artisans are welcome. Please join us. This event is free and open to the public. Bring a project and sit, stitch, relax, and fellowship while sharing your projects. For more information contact Monica Moore, call 205-652-3828, or email centerforblackbelt@uwa.edu.

 

 

UWA 5-Year Progress Report

The University of West Alabama 5-Year Progress Report.

Please click here to view the digital document.

© 2014 Center for the Study of the Black Belt